Bolivia (2001)

 

 

 

Director:  Adrin Caetano.

Starring:  Freddy Flores (Freddy), Rosa Snchez (Rosa), Oscar Bertea (Oso), Enrique Liporace (Enrique Galmes), Marcelo Videla (Marcelo), Hctor Anglada (Hctor, the Salesman), Alberto Mercado (Mercado), Luis Enrique Caetano (Hombre Locutorio), Rodolfo Resch (Hombre Locutorio II),  Rafael Ferro (Borracho), Rafael Solano (Policia Civil), Claudio Iturrieta (Policia Civil II), Armando Doral (DueZo Pensin).

Bolivian immigrant in Argentina finds big challenges.

 

Freddy (Freddy Flores) is a poor, former farm worker from Bolivia with a wife and three little girls.  He has come to Argentina alone (and without a work permit) and has found work at the Cafe/Bar Parrilla. Freddy takes a liking to the waitress Rosa (Rosa Snchez), who he takes out dancing at the "Bolivian hideout."

Everyone seems to think, because of his Indian heritage, that he is from Peru.  And it is this heritage that is going to be one of the sources of problems for Freddy. 

And one can sense that there is going to be big problems, especially from a customer named Oso (Oscar Bertea).  The hard drinking Oso is down on his luck and he is looking for someone other than himself to blame.  He condemns Uruguayans for causing him a great deal of financial problems.  Oso sounds just like the American rednecks, which is an all too familiar phenomenon in the United States.  Some of the phrases are familiar: don't forget to hire your own countrymen first; they're taking the bread right out of our mouths; and fucking foreigner. And Oso is soon throwing invectives at Freddy.  He calls Freddy a "negro mierdo" or something like that which means dirty/shitty black, but the subtitles use the N word.   

A sense of foreboding keeps the viewer on edge. 

 

Good film.  It is interesting to see Argentine rednecks at work.  (The white Argentineans are oh so proud of the fact that they are descended from white Europeans without all the racial mixing as in countries like Mexico and Brazil.)  It gives the American viewer the chance to compare and contrast.  Here, unfortunately, the scenario is all to similar. 

Patrick Louis Cooney, Ph. D.

 

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